Cross-posted from Doug Peterson

In my Twitter stream last night, I saw a message from the Guy Kawasaki Alltop stream that talked about an infographic about Love & Hate on Twitter.  I’m a sucker for a good infographic so clicked through and saw the image.

It’s a long infographic and so it took some time to read through and totally understand what was in the design.  I had this bizarre feeling that I’d seen this before.  It’s not too bizarre because I’ll spend time reading these things and I know that I’ll revisit some of them.  Then, I hit the bottom of the infographic and saw Copyright @ 2011 Neoformix.  My head snapped up just a bit.  Neoformix is Jeff Clark.  Jeff is a former student of mine and Neoformix is an outlet for his graphic and programming creativity when he’s not out running.

I flipped over to the Neoformix website to confirm and, yep, that’s him.  But, there’s more.

I think that most people like a good infographic.  But, if you’ve ever tried to create one yourself or assign it to students, it is not a trivial task to undertake.  I think that most people just assume that you open Photoshop and then go to it.  And, for the most part, that may be right.  However, for this infographic, Jeff has created a blog entry describing how he created it.  I was impressed when he started off indicating that he collected the data for “love” and “hate” from over a couple of years.  Talk about dedication to the project.

As you read the post, and I hope that you do, Jeff provides a nice insight to the developer side of these things.  It’s great reading.  I know that @pmcash was going to explore doing this as an activity in Computer Science this year.  After all, many infographics are a new spin on working with histograms, a standard task in programming.

So, please take a moment to read Jeff’s post and if you’re having students create infographics, bookmark it for later reference.  It’s a keeper.

 

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