Virtual Integrity and the Digital Citizen

Virtual Integrity and the Digital Citizen

Integrity is a key virtue for today’s culture, says Sister Geralyn Schmidt, education technology coordinator for the Diocese of Harrisburg (PA). “In today’s world, each of us who has a digital footprint makes two impressions: one in the real world and one in the virtual world. The words and attitudes that we use in both arenas must match. When we achieve this, we become someone whom others can truly rely upon.”

Support Teacher 101

Pulling children out for extra help can be a tricky area to navigate, writes Arwen Kuttner, reflecting on her first year in a support teacher role. “Elementary age children walk a tightrope between craving the individual attention I can give them, and the fear that others will think less of them for needing that attention. I have to normalize the experience and make them feel good about coming.” Here are some ways she works to accomplish that.

Break Down, Rebuild, Start Fresh

Taking the posture of a learner first, educator second requires us to understand that we will never arrive at the place of “super educator.” The truth is that even if we solve the problems facing us as a profession, the solutions will only give way to new problems. Now more than ever we need to become the learners we have always wanted our students to be. We do not need information about teaching and learning. We need revelation.

Evernote: A Great Tool for Organizing Teachers & Students!

Evernote can be a great application for teachers, both to keep yourself coordinated and to facilitate student learning. School-based technology director Jennifer Carey talks educators through getting started and highlights several ways she’s used Evernote to “not only make my life a little easier as a teacher, but to help my students and my classroom stay more focused and organized.”

Reflecting on Reflection

It’s like John Dewey told us. Positive professional growth and positive student growth will not happen without learning and practicing the art of reflection, says Rachel Small. It’s a process we must trust. It’s time we must invest.